Stanley L. Swartz, Ph.D.
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Jennifer kozar
Reply with quote  #16 

1.Many regular classroom teachers feel overwhelmed by their current duties. It isreasonable to expect them to provide for the needs of a child with disabilitiesin their classroom.

 

Ican understand that at times teachers are stressed and overworked but by takingthe role of a teacher, you are the key to every child's future, disabled ornot. Teachers provide the necessary materials to help each and every studentsucceed in life. I myself would not turn away any student expected of me ornot. No student learns the same way, and the teachers should know that, so bydoing a little research on tools that could be used in the classroom to teachstudents with disabilities or non-disabilities could make the environment anenjoyable less stressful one. Teachers would need to learn about the child'sdisability and provide the necessary tools needed to help that child betterunderstand and follow the instructions on a daily basis. The more knowledge youknow about the disability the better teaching you can provide. The more youinclude a child with a disability the more they feel as one with the class andnot just an outsider. Many support systems are put in place to help teachers. Iwas in one class that had two teacher aides. Even though I know not allclassrooms with students who have disabilities have aides, it did take a littleof the stress off the teacher. Peer tutoring can also be a useful supportsystem. Giving students with disabilities one on one attention with otherstudents can help give them that extra little time they need. Teachers justneed love, patience and time to make a difference in a young ones life.

Monique Manzano
Reply with quote  #17 

First off I would like to say that there should be nothing wrong with a teacher feeling or becoming overwhelmed by their current duties to students with disabilities in their classroom. Many times it can being extremely hard and at times frustrating for the teacher but understanding how different a student with disabilities is and how extremely hard it is for them just to grasp a topic to understand is just as much more difficult and frustrating.  I would say that it is reasonable and expected for them to provide for the needs of child with disabilities in their classroom but to a certain extent. The teacher shouldn’t be expected to just right away teach an objective or topic to a student with disabilities and be able to make them learn it. It will take a teacher much time and effort to teach the student because a student with disabilities needs time and effort to learn what is being taught to them. A teacher having to provide for each child’s needs in their classroom is a difficult task because in the class there is only one teacher and him or her having to provide for all their needs is too overwhelming a teacher would need help and at times is giving help from aids or students who have assisted help aids yet the teacher is the one who is teaching them and each student learns at his or her own pace so in the case of teachers being expected to provide for the needs of a child with disabilities in their classroom I would say yes they should be but with an extent that the teacher may not be able to provide each and every day  for all their individual needs.

Kristin Kyker
Reply with quote  #18 

 

It is a teacher's responsibility to provide for the needs of all students in his or her classroom. Though most instructors face the issue of too much work and too little time, strategies can be used to effectively instruct all students, including those with disabilities. Students with disabilities have individualized education programs that guide and educate the teacher to his or her special needs. Supplemental materials for the disabled student can be an easy way for the teacher to meet his or her needs. In some cases, a student may be assigned a paraprofessional to aide the instructor in specific needs. A paraprofessional may be assigned to the general class or work one on one with one student. If the student has many needs, he or she will often have  a one-on-one aide. There are also minor adjustments that can be made to general education lesson plans to accommodate the disabled student. Changes such as larger print, visually designed materials or longer allotted time can allow disabled students to engage in regular education activities. Peer-to-peer instruction and tutoring is also an effective strategy that does not require a significant amount of time away from general instruction for the teacher. In addition, peer tutoring offers interaction between students that may never have interacted with one another otherwise. Peer learning can spark friendships and understanding between students with and without disabilities. Students can also aide their peers in physical education activities. The previously mentioned ideas are just some of the possible strategies that general education teachers can use.

Cindy Montoya
Reply with quote  #19 

I do believe that it is reasonable to expect regular education teachers to provide for the needs of a child with disabilities in their classrooms because all students that are placed in regular education classes may exhibit or be afflicted by the dysfunctions of special education students. It is in the best interest of the regular education teachers to be knowledgeable and competent with the strategies and differentiated instruction that can be beneficial for all in the classroom. There can be a combination of both or a blend of both instructional efforts that will allow a teacher to provide for a student with special needs. With that in mind, I believe that regular education teacher should try their best and considered the fact that these students are not like mainstream students and they are entitled to such services and also are entitled to have an alternative way to provide instructional assistance for these children with disabilities. For example , the assistance of an aide. The aide can occasionally correct the student in any area, such as history , math or English. However, I notice that a lot of teachers leave their aides to provide all the needs for the child and I strongly believe it’s a team effort. However, if the severity of the child is extremely severe, then there is no reason why a child should be place in a regular education classroom, because it will not only affect mainstream students, but the student with the disability as well, for not being in the right environment, and therefore the child should be place in the correct classroom that can provide the student with their needs.

Cindy Montoya
Reply with quote  #20 

I do believe that it is reasonable to expect regular education teachers to provide for the needs of a child with disabilities in their classrooms because all students that are placed in regular education classes may exhibit or be afflicted by the dysfunctions of special education students. It is in the best interest of the regular education teachers to be knowledgeable and competent with the strategies and differentiated instruction that can be beneficial for all in the classroom. There can be a combination of both or a blend of both instructional efforts that will allow a teacher to provide for a student with special needs. With that in mind, I believe that regular education teacher should try their best and consider the fact that these students are not like mainstream students and they are entitled to such services and also are entitled to have an alternative way to provide instructional assistance for these children with disabilities. For example , the assistance of an aide. The aide can occasionally correct the student in any area, such as history , math or English. However, I notice that a lot of teachers leave their aides to provide all the needs for the child and I strongly believe it’s a team effort. However, if the severity of the child is extremely severe, then there is no reason why a child should be place in a regular education classroom, because it will not only affect mainstream students, but the student with the disability as well, for not being in the right environment, and therefore the child should be place in the correct classroom that can provide the student with their needs.

Tom Howe
Reply with quote  #21 

Absolutely, even though classroom teachers are overwhelmed with duties and what is expected of them.  One of classroom teacher’s basic expectations is to also manage, plan and deliver instruction for all students, including student with disabilities.  In particular, teachers are ethically and legally required to follow IEP strategies for students with special services.  This does add to most teachers already full work load, but it is a fact of classroom instructor’s life spelled out in mandated NCLB/IDEA legislation.  These directions have dramatically altered what is expect of teachers, and classroom teachers are now required to develop instructional practices that are strategically planned and carried out to satisfy all obligations.  With that in mind, teachers must learn to be creative and to facilitate methods to do this.

            Perhaps elements of NCLB and IDEA legislation are compelling teachers to “step up their game” for classroom duties, particularly with disabled students.  In reality, the teachers simply addressing the different needs and abilities of all students provide the basic strategic framework to address IEP student obligations.  The IEP stipulations should further assist special need students with the support and collaboration of the IEP team members.  With a plan that allows special services and instruction to be team managed, classroom teachers could conceivably find lemonade where lemons were.  Perhaps some of the instructors’ feelings with being overwhelmed is a symptom of insufficient support and interaction from the school’s administrators and other teachers.  With the NCLB/IDEA directive, previous strategies are now dependent on assistance and teamwork to achieve a sense of sanity again for classroom teachers.  All of this, teachers helping each other, might lessen the burden on disabled students, who also feel overwhelmed in the classroom.

Julie Wright
Reply with quote  #22 

Generally no, regular classroom teachers are already overwhelmed by the duties of teaching and preparing for a classroom of 30 or more different students.  However there are benefits to having students with disabilities in the regular classroom, it is a learning experience for both regular and disabled students. 

Depending on the student and the disability asking a regular classroom teacher to accommodate for a mild disability such as a learning disability may be acceptable.  For example, students with minor learning disabilities such as dyslexia, which requires minimal additional work for the teacher is appropriate.  The student with disabilities should also attend some form of additional resource or study skills time in which another teacher or aide can help the student develop and expand their abilities in the classroom, and to also help the student to more fully understand the concepts and ideas presented in the regular classroom.

Many students with more moderate and severe disabilities are more disruptive and can have more behavior problems.  A regular classroom teacher should not be expected to provide for these students. Since the needs for the more severely disabled students requires additional one to one time.  The one-on-one time with the student with disabilities would take away a significant amount of time from the general education students.  Perhaps providing for these moderate and severe students part time with the assistance of an aide would be more appropriate for a regular classroom and classroom teacher.  Another reason a regular classroom teacher should not be expected to provide for students suffering from severe disabilities is because the teacher in not educated or prepared to properly accommodate the needs of that child.  Special education teachers would have the background and tools required to teach these students.

Mara Aikin
Reply with quote  #23 
Classroom teachers tend to feel overwhelmed by many things in the classroom. With the current academic struggles of our districts class size alone would be overwhelming for any teacher new or experienced. New test regulation and the current uproar about teachers students' test scores being public knowledge. With all of these new stresses the recent push for inclusion would be understandably overwhelming for a teacher. I believe that this overwhelming experience can be calmed but only with the change of current and old classroom techniques. The rule that teachers are the main responsible adult, leader and organizer of the classroom must re assessed and changed so that collaborative models and dispersed responsibility may relieve this sense of overwhelming work load. Inclusion is the obligation of teachers and the school as well. Often administrators are reluctant to offer that extra help and resources needed in these classrooms where special needs students are included. If ample resources are given and support from special education departments are provided as well at education on the student and their needs, general education teachers will realize that this task is not as difficult as it may seem on paper. Different teaching strategies can be implemented to provide support for special needs students and the rest of the classroom as well. What is overwhelming for teachers is finding out what these strategies are training themselves and learning how their special needs student learns and what environment they function better in. If teachers received enough information and preparation time as well as in service training on these strategies these teachers levels of anxiety will be no more than that of their peers with no special needs students in their class.
Francisco JUribe
Reply with quote  #24 

      It is reasonable and expected for a regular classroom teacher to provide for the needs of a child with disabilities. Assuming that the student is appropriately placed, a teacher who cannot provide for the needs of students with disabilities is simply not doing their job correctly. If a teacher has the skills to manage their time and resources wisely, then providing special services or accommodations should not be a problem. The key to success is preparation. Teachers should take time out of their day to create a plan that incorporates the strengths of the students with disabilities into the core curriculum of the classroom. Students with special needs have an IEP team that supports them. Regular classroom teachers can use the members of the IEP to inform themselves and get some insight on the student. Children with disabilities benefit immensely from experiences in general education settings. They are exposed to more authentic social experiences, which is an aspect that many segregated special education classroom fail to provide. Providing special accommodations should be seen as a basic necessity for a student with disabilities to be able to learn. Some can argue that a regular education teacher has limited time and a large number of students (especially in middle school and high school), and spending time accommodating a single student is not fair to the rest of the students. I would argue that one of the ways to debunk this argument is by making people understand that people are provided special services because of necessity, and the only way to be “fair” is by providing a child with a disability the same chance to be successful as his peers.

Cathy Autry
Reply with quote  #25 
The inclusion of disabled children into regular classroom setting is becoming the norm in many schools in many states.  Although, it is unfortunate that many teachers are feeling overwhelmed with their current students.  But the teachers must realize that teaching in itself can be a great undertaking that occurs on a regular daily basis, but the rewards in the end are all worth it to most who have chosen this profession of teaching.  Based on this, teaching children with disabilities can be looked upon as an extended reward.  It is these special children who will teach their fellow students and the teacher in acts of compassion and understanding in many ways that they would not have imagined before hand.  In the assignment of the disabled children into regular classrooms the number of these children that are assigned will not make a difference in the total number of students overall.  The disabled students will only make a difference in the inclusion and accommodations that are needed for some of them to be able to participate in and understand the lessons and activities that are taking place. After these initial adjustments are made for the students it then becomes routine classroom maintenance as with any other student.  If children with disabilities are transitioning into regular classrooms, then the teachers will have to learn to expect this as a new duty required in the profession of teaching. Most of the the disabled children are flourishing in these environments and it is thanks to the teachers and educational staff that is taking part in this.  So, I believe that it is reasonable for them to provide for the needs of the disabled children.

Kitzia Candor
Reply with quote  #26 

It is so difficult to say that teachers who have already a full load of work, with 30+ students may still need to accommodate for a student with special needs without saying if it is fair or not. Though what is fair like in a video we watched is not necessarily that all the rules or expectations of each student are the same. As the teacher should know when she goes into this career that you cannot pick and choose what kind of students you will have. You cannot expect to not have a higher functioning special needs student that may need some accommodations. The child may need all books enlarged to a larger print, or if in a wheel chair...etc., you need to be able to accommodate what you have to work with for that student just like every other student. It is the teachers’ responsibility to do so. There was a quote I always try to remember that was taught to me, that states; you need to accommodate your classroom and class rules and expectations to the students, not the students to the classroom. I completely agree and if I had a student with a special need I would have to take the responsibility to help this student for him or her to succeed. As stated in one of the lectures inclusion is necessary but we need the cooperation of all teachers, to be able to have this work. If a teacher is not willing it makes it hard, and impossible to allow the student to succeed if the teacher feels too overwhelmed and refuses to make the changes necessary, and do her or his job.

Kaley Weakly
Reply with quote  #27 

           Being a teacher obviously comes with an extraordinary amount of work and involvement on an already over-packed schedule. Part of the job is to adapt and adjust to curveballs that are thrown. I firmly believe that teachers are more than capable of providing for the needs of a child with disabilities.

            As we all know, when studying to become a teacher all aspects of the field are covered. We need to prepare and know how to handle a student with a disability in the classroom. Teachers need to be equipped with the right tools and support systems to provide the individualized education that every student deserves, with or without a disability.  Teachers need to be prepared to handle any situation under any circumstances. If the teacher is not ready to take on the extra responsibility of a student with a disability, then they are not ready to teach. The most important thing for these teachers to realize is that they are all students first and the disability comes after.

            If teaching weren’t hard, there would be many more people trying to do what we do. Adapting and preparing for anything is part of our job description. It is my stand that any teacher preparation programs require courses in Special Education training. It is not only our job, but the student’s right to the best education possible. If a teacher is not prepared for every type of student in the classroom, then her training has failed her and the educational system.  

Katie Smith
Reply with quote  #28 

      In today’s world, teachers areencompassing more responsibilities than ever. They are expected to achieve hightest scores, follow state standards and provide an all encompassing educationthat children can build upon for the future. Furthermore, instructors mustassume the accountability for creating a learning environment that will supportall their students, including children with disabilities. This can be adifficult feat to accomplish, but teachers should do everything in their powerto help each child to succeed.  

      Forinstance, when an individual first becomes a teacher, they assume the role ofhelping each child, no matter their race, intelligence or disability inbecoming accomplished in his or her classroom. Not only are they theoretically accountablefor this objective, but each instructor should want to undertake this task on adaily basis. As a result, I feel as though it is not too demanding to require generaleducation teachers to provide for the needs of a child with disabilities withintheir classroom.

      Even though inrecent years classroom sizes have increased in size, teachers still have toadjust the curriculum in order to adhere to children with disabilities. Yes,this will take more time and exertion to achieve, but by accepting a positionas a teacher, he or she needs to have the understanding that they couldencounter a similar situation in their classroom. Hopefully, general educationteachers will receive the aid of resource specialist teachers to further assistthem in facilitating modifications and strategies that each special needsstudent will necessitate throughout the school year.

      Therefore,it is without a doubt that when a general education teacher includes a student withdisabilities in his or her classroom, a production of difficulties and challengeswill be produced. However, just as teachers have high expectations from theirstudents, each student should also hold their teachers to the same standards.This can consist of expecting every teacher to encompass the capability of workingwith all students from diverse backgrounds and abilities. A child withdisabilities possesses a life that is, and will be, comprised with trials andtribulations. Consequently, each teacher should execute and establish alearning program that is constructed for each student. After all, every personwho becomes a teacher should take a personal pledge to holistically educate eachstudent to the best of their capabilities.   

Valerie Linton
Reply with quote  #29 
I believe that it is reasonable to expect regular classroom teachers to provide for the needs of a child with disabilities in their classroom.  Many times a child with a disability is not hindered in their ability to learn.  It really does not take much on the part of the teacher to accomodate them.  When a child has special needs, an aide is provided to help the teacher to work with the child.  Regardless of a child's disability, they are entitled to an education.  Regular classroom teachers are required to differentiate their lessons to work with all different types of students.  This is part of their job.  All children learn differently, whether they are disabled or not.  The classroom teacher should expect to be providing instruction to all different types of students.  It can be hard on a teacher to provide instruction to a child with a disability, which is why the aides are provided. 
I believe that if there is no assistance provided to the teacher and the student's disability is a distraction to the teacher, it can sometimes be a bit of a challenge to provide all of the students in the class with a proper education.  Teachers should not be expected to be able to be everywhere at the same time.  An example of this is what is currently going on in my sister's classroom.  My sister teaches 5th grade, and has 33 students in her class.  She has a student that is autistic.  When he is asked to do anything other than draw, he has a fit.  His fits are loud and disruptive.  They require my sister to go sit with him and calm him down.  He is very resistant to do any work, even though he is capable.  There is no aide provided to my sister to help her deal with him.  Also, she has not been provided with training to help her manage his outbursts.  I do not think this is right.  I believe that this child is entitled to a good education, but I think it is a lot to expect of my sister to manage these outbursts and also provide good management and instruction to the other 32 kids in the classroom.  I think it should be a requirement that aides and support be provided to teachers when they are teaching a child with a disability.  As long as a teacher has the proper support, I believe that it is reasonable to expect them to provide a good education to any child that is in their care.
Melanie Hedges
Reply with quote  #30 

I think that it can be reasonable to ask a general education teacher to teach a child with special needs as long as that teacher gets adequate support and assistance to teach such a classroom.  I think that the teacher should have at least one teacher’s Aide if not two or three depending on the size of the classroom and number of students attending.  Further, depending on the student’s disability, it might be in the best interest for the child to have a personal aide at school. 

I think that the student’s type of disability should be taken into consideration in determining classroom placement.  Then resources need to be determined as necessary such as if medical care needs to be provided by a medical professional or whether the students’ needs can be successfully taken care of by the teacher or teacher’s aide.  I think there are a lot of things that need to be worked out before the general education teacher should be responsible for a class with both special needs and non-special needs children. 

Overall, mainstreaming children with special needs is absolutely the best scenario, but to be successful, the general education teacher must receive adequate support as needed in the classroom.  Also, classroom sizes need to be reduced to a reasonable size which can be better managed by a teacher.  This can be done by either modifying the amount of children assigned to each classroom or by adding more hired aides or assistances to help the teacher out.

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