Stanley L. Swartz, Ph.D.
 |  Latest Topics  |  Chat
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment   Page 6 of 15     «   Prev   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   Next   »
Breanna Hunt
Reply with quote  #76 

I have been extremely lucky in working with an absolutely amazing special education teacher, I have never seen so much patience and knowledge. However, while subbing in other special education classes I have seen the most unloving, irritating, poor teachers. If I could change anything it would be to have teachers in the classroom that actually care. The teachers make the difference in these classes. If a teacher is truly looking to help these students out they put everything into their classes, it isn’t just a job for them, it is something they are passionate about. I wish that every child could have a teacher like the woman I worked with.

I also think that a major obstacle in serving children with disabilities is testing to classify their disabilities. I would like to see more uniform assessment measures. If we had this it would make getting the help that these students need much easier.

I would also recommend more help for the parents. With this I do not mean more monetary services, but more so “parenting classes” on how to deal with their situations. I understand that these are available but it really is not easy to find. I work with a blind child and we were putting together a packet of services available for him and his parents. I had the internet available, I understood where to look for resources, I had help and it would still extremely difficult to find resources for him. If parents are going through this they probably feel very alone. I would like resources to be more openly available for parents. If parents had support systems of other parents who understood what they were going through, suggestions from others, and just advice/help in general they would be able to help their children more and the education system.

Benita Vazquez
Reply with quote  #77 

 

Thechanges that I would recommend to provide services to children with disabilitiesare related to the modification of instructional materials and testing. I thinkthat the instructional materials like subject books and tests should be preparedwith a simplest vocabulary that will help students understand what they arereading. I’m not asking to change the content but to modify the set of wordsassociated with a subject to the student’s level of cognition instead to theirgrade level.

As an instructional assistant, Ihave observed for the last three years how students experience frustration andanxiety during class direction and state testing, especially if they cannotunderstand the phrasing and questions. The wording used in tests and books isabove their comprehension level. The instructor that I work with is very goodat taking time to provide definitions in words that they can understand. Wework with the book’s glossary and the dictionary and transform the topicquestions and definitions so students can relate to the terminology and topic.However this does not work at all when they have to take a test in which theycannot receive any type of help and the phrasing of such texts raises thestudent’s level of anxiety  to the point thatthey feel there is no sense to make an effort and finish the test by guessing.As a student I have learn that a teacher  has to include students with disabilities instate and  district wide assessments thatmeasure student progress toward learning outcomes, but how am I going toachieve this if the people that creates this type of testing do not know how  disabled students can recognize, discern, and analyzeinformation.

 
Attached Files
docx onlinedisc530-3ok.docx (26.64 KB, 11 views)

Kristal Stanley
Reply with quote  #78 

If I could change the way we provide services to students with disabilities I would recommend doing two things.

The first step that I would recommend is more frequent IEP meetings with more in-depth and purposeful testing. This would provide a better understanding for parents and teachers of where the child needs help and possibly provide new approaches for accommodating the student in the most inclusive environment. In my own experience I saw a case where a student who has a disability be placed in a special day class. The student was then medicated and the student should have been able to participate fully but they not moved back to general education. This is a detriment to the student and because their IEP is only once a year they will remain in the class that is not appropriate for them any longer.

The second step that I would take is assigning more one on one aides as well as supplemental classroom aides. In the system that we have now aides are only assigned to very severe cases and rarely allow an aide for the entire class. This leads to the one on one aides becoming a general aides and the student that needs the extra help not getting it. I think that paraprofessionals can be a great resource. They provide more time for the resident teacher to teach rather than punish, as well as helping keep students on task and being able to observe where students may need extra help.  

I feel that with these two steps taken there will be more focus on where the students are achieving or falling behind rather than punishment. Because of the awareness of how the students are performing it would help to place students in the least restrictive environment. 

Antonio Gutierrez
Reply with quote  #79 
 If I personally could change our current educational system, I would change a number of things. The biggest change would be that I would eliminate the current category of mildly to moderately disabled. All of these formerly stigmatized students would leave their insufficient RSP programs and be incorporated into the regular education classroom setting. Recent studies have indicated that these student progress better in the regular education setting when compared to our current system. They would not be diagnosed as being disabled, rather they will each more specialized help within the classroom without an official diagnosis. This consolidation of students and services would undoubtedly save the school system a lot of money, and lead to happier smarter and well-adjusted students. I would require that all services be provided in the regular education classroom for all students who needed special assistance not just the disabled. By allowing all children access to the services of the disabled children will feel less stigmatized and more children will be helped. I would keep special education only for the severely handicapped with the threshold for admittance to be lower than the current moderate to severe threshold. I would make the teachers of these students qualified to accommodate their student’s special needs as they are now. I would not allow testing of the students in special education unless it is solely intended for the benefit of the child and will not be compared to any other child’s test. I do like the IEP setup for students with severe disabilities, however I would mandate that it be done at least twice a year.

 

Antonio Gutierrez
Reply with quote  #80 
 If I personally could change our current educational system, I would change a number of things. The biggest change would be that I would eliminate the current category of mildly to moderately disabled. All of these formerly stigmatized students would leave their insufficient RSP programs and be incorporated into the regular education classroom setting. Recent studies have indicated that these student progress better in the regular education setting when compared to our current system. They would not be diagnosed as being disabled, rather they will each more specialized help within the classroom without an official diagnosis. This consolidation of students and services would undoubtedly save the school system a lot of money, and lead to happier smarter and well-adjusted students. I would require that all services be provided in the regular education classroom for all students who needed special assistance not just the disabled. By allowing all children access to the services of the disabled children will feel less stigmatized and more children will be helped. I would keep special education only for the severely handicapped with the threshold for admittance to be lower than the current moderate to severe threshold. I would make the teachers of these students qualified to accommodate their student’s special needs as they are now. I would not allow testing of the students in special education unless it is solely intended for the benefit of the child and will not be compared to any other child’s test. I do like the IEP setup for students with severe disabilities, however I would mandate that it be done at least twice a year.

 

Antonio Gutierrez
Reply with quote  #81 
 If I personally could change our current educational system, I would change a number of things. The biggest change would be that I would eliminate the current category of mildly to moderately disabled. All of these formerly stigmatized students would leave their insufficient RSP programs and be incorporated into the regular education classroom setting. Recent studies have indicated that these student progress better in the regular education setting when compared to our current system. They would not be diagnosed as being disabled, rather they will each more specialized help within the classroom without an official diagnosis. This consolidation of students and services would undoubtedly save the school system a lot of money, and lead to happier smarter and well-adjusted students. I would require that all services be provided in the regular education classroom for all students who needed special assistance not just the disabled. By allowing all children access to the services of the disabled children will feel less stigmatized and more children will be helped. I would keep special education only for the severely handicapped with the threshold for admittance to be lower than the current moderate to severe threshold. I would make the teachers of these students qualified to accommodate their student’s special needs as they are now. I would not allow testing of the students in special education unless it is solely intended for the benefit of the child and will not be compared to any other child’s test. I do like the IEP setup for students with severe disabilities, however I would mandate that it be done at least twice a year.

 

Antonio Gutierrez
Reply with quote  #82 
 If I personally could change our current educational system, I would change a number of things. The biggest change would be that I would eliminate the current category of mildly to moderately disabled. All of these formerly stigmatized students would leave their insufficient RSP programs and be incorporated into the regular education classroom setting. Recent studies have indicated that these student progress better in the regular education setting when compared to our current system. They would not be diagnosed as being disabled, rather they will each more specialized help within the classroom without an official diagnosis. This consolidation of students and services would undoubtedly save the school system a lot of money, and lead to happier smarter and well-adjusted students. I would require that all services be provided in the regular education classroom for all students who needed special assistance not just the disabled. By allowing all children access to the services of the disabled children will feel less stigmatized and more children will be helped. I would keep special education only for the severely handicapped with the threshold for admittance to be lower than the current moderate to severe threshold. I would make the teachers of these students qualified to accommodate their student’s special needs as they are now. I would not allow testing of the students in special education unless it is solely intended for the benefit of the child and will not be compared to any other child’s test. I do like the IEP setup for students with severe disabilities, however I would mandate that it be done at least twice a year.

 

katherine page
Reply with quote  #83 

I think instructing students with disabilities in core academic material such as math, reading, history etc. is extremely important. However, I also feel it is important for the students to be able to generalize or apply these skills to real life.  I would add to the standards of special education and even to general education maybe beginning in elementary school but definitely junior high a functional aspect what they are learning.  The functional should relate to independent living as well as employment related.  I think the extra programs brought to the schools to make school fun is important but I also believe students with disabilities should physically be brought to real life community environments such as work sites, grocery stores, the post office,  and any other community-based environment where students can see practical skills as it relates to everyday activities. If community-based instruction is properly done, students with disabilities will be able to combine what they've learned inside classroom as well as what they've learned outside of the classroom and apply these skills for successful  post-school independent living.  The goal to special education is for students to be able  to generalize the skills they have learned outside of the classroom and effectively manage their lives in a real life community-based setting.  This then needs to be taught at a young age, not just in high school.  There is an elementary school when I was substituting that actually did this for their SH class.  There was a “job skills room” where the students were able to put their learning to practical use; sorting laundry, measuring liquids to go into recipes, a cash register with money an a list of items for a student to collect then buy, etc.  These are real life skills and it generalized the math, reading and other information to real life skills. 

Natalie Mikroulis
Reply with quote  #84 
I am still learning and understanding the different ways in which services are provided to children with disabilities. I feel that it is an ever evolving system that continues to pursue excellence in educating children with disabilities. I have read about the progress that has been made and hear about from others the progress that is needed.
I was saddened to read that just by changing school districts a child could change their disability. I  feel that this should not happen. The school districts should collaborate to make sure that children get consistent services throughout the state. If children with disabilities have to move and then get completely different services this could impede their ability to learn. 
I have found that specialized services often are only received a few times a week. I feel that this is not enough. Especially If a child with disabilities is chronically I'll, this would mean they would miss many valuable sessions of specialized instruction. These specialized sessions should be integrated with the regular class. This would allow the child with disabilities to have specialized instruction everyday. This is one reason why I think the collaborative method is so important and should be used more. I have visited many classrooms and have done many observations and have never seen the collaborative method being used. It was only this class that has brought to my attention this wonderful teaching method.    
I feel that children with disabilities deserve to receive consistent services. I think they needs to have those services integrated into their everyday class So they can feel confident that they belong with society and not isolated in another room. 
Daniel Rojas
Reply with quote  #85 

If I were to change the way services are provided to students with disabilities I would require that all teachers take more courses on during and post higher education.  The courses would focus on children with disabilities.  Children with disabilities would benefit from a teacher with more knowledge in special education.  In addition more financial resources should be put aside, so that training, technology and other special education services would be made available to schools.  More money would allow for better resources for special education.  Schools should be modified to meet the accessible needs of children with physical disabilities.  Inclusion would be the primary means of education for these students, so that they would be able to be in an educational plus social setting with their peers.  All types of disabilities would be taken in to account when setting up the school.  Educational opportunities for special education students should be extended well into their mid twenties. Increased social time would benefit student with disabilities.  Many times people with disabilities stay home after school.  Options for families to have learning integration at home would be made available.  Family education about children with disabilities would be made mandatory so that everyone would be on the same page as far as the child’s education goes.  Goals should be met that allow for children to have more interesting social interactions.  Field trips should involve going to places that allow for the student to see new things outside of their daily experiences.  Of course money needs to available for these types of services, so the education in general should receive more.  By increasing the skills teachers need to have it would increase their salary.  In turn this would bring more teachers into the special education field in general creating an environment of teachers that want to work in special education.  

Esther Sandoval
Reply with quote  #86 

If I could change theway services are provided to children with special disabilities I would say noinclusion when it comes to the subjects of math, English, science, and socialstudies. For other subjects such as art or physical education etc, it is ok forstudents with disabilities to be in a regular classroom. I believe this becausewe already know that these kids are special so they need special attention andspecial education. This means that they need special lesson plans that accommodateto their learning needs. A regular classroom teacher is not trained to teachchildren with disabilities so they will not know how to handle having to teacha child with disabilities. If a child is in a classroom where the teacher givesthem the attention they need to learn, then they will be in a better learningenvironment and will score higher in standardized tests. Inclusion should onlybe when it comes to other subjects like I had mentioned above, art or physicaleducation. It is also a good thing for these to interact or socialize withchildren from a regular classroom. Another thing I would change is the factthat they make these kids standardize test. I really do not think that that isfair for them because I know that these tests are hard for the regular kids sohow harder can they be for children with disabilities. These are some of thethings I would change.

Violeta Ortega-V.
Reply with quote  #87 

3. If you could change the way we provide services to children with disabilities, what would you recommend?

If I was able to change something about how services are provided to students who have disabilities, I would want for students to be tested at a younger age so that services could be provided to them. The sooner students are able to receive services the more beneficial it would be to them. Another area I would hope for change to happen is having more information about special education because especial education has negative stigmas which hurt and affect many students. It is very important to get rid of this stigma. Our society has to be well informing of what especial education really is. It is also important to recognize that we all have certain needs regardless of being in a program or not. Emphasis the importance of been individuals and that we all do things differently as well. another thing we need to change is the way we only focus on special education children. Like mention before, I have a strong believe that we all have certain areas in which we do better and other areas we do not. I think that we are losing focus of whom we really trying to help in the special education program instead of learning different techniques that will help and suppor all the students in general and not just a specific group of students.

Juan Casas
Reply with quote  #88 
If I could change the way we provide services to children with disabilities I would recommend several changes. To begin with, I would recommend that special education educators be paid a much higher salary. I make this recommendation in the hopes of luring better educators and in the hopes of adding legitimacy to our profession. I strongly feel that special educators need to carry themselves in a much more professional manner and utilize more evidence-based practices, conduct more meaningful progress monitoring, etc. The next recommendation I would make would be for class sizes to be heavily reduced. Currently, I have direct service special education classes with 16-20 students and know of several teachers in my district with similar class sizes. Serving 3-4 classes with this number of students is very difficult when each student has specific needs. In addition, data collection and progress monitoring is very difficult for classes with these types of numbers. If class sizes could be brought down to a maximum of 10 students per direct service class, I feel that the quality of education would be much greater. With lower numbers, 178 teachers would be able to work on a more individual basis with their students. In addition, teachers would be able to engage in more detailed and thorough data collection and progress monitoring. My next recommendation would be to increase the amount of collaboration time special education teachers have with their general education counterparts. This would be extremely productive and would hopefully result in closer alignment between general education curriculum and assignments and the goals and objectives for special education students. In addition, this would provide special education teachers with more opportunity to help general education teachers with ideas and strategies for assisting their special education students. I feel that the aforementioned recommendations would at least be a good start to improving the services provided to our children with disabilities.
Karen Jantzen
Reply with quote  #89 

   I would change it so that the goal would be for every child to be included in the general classroom.  Each student should be evaluated individually, and with the advice of the IEP team, the parents (and child whenever appropriate) should make the final decision, which may not be total inclusion.  However, we should always strive for inclusion. 

   I think the regular classrooms should have lower class size.  If California had the money, I think that’s the first thing to spend it on.  20 students per class should be the maximum, and not just for grades K-3.  I was reading about a school in Siilitie, an economically challenged suburb of Helsinki, Finland, where over 50% of the students have been diagnosed with learning disabilities, and the teacher (including aides) to student to ratio is 1 to 7.   A teacher can do so much more for the students she has when the number is reasonable.  Class size matters.

   I would also love to change the attitude of many classroom teachers.  I know countless teachers whom I believe to be competent, creative, diligent, and caring, but I am often astounded to hear the surprisingly thoughtless ways in which they refer to children with disabilities or any subgroup.  When considering their class make-up they so often lump students in categories (“I have 2 major behavior problems, 6 LEP kids, 5 RSP, and today I got a new one who only speaks Lithuanian…)  I know they feel overburdened and often incapable of addressing the myriad needs of each and every one of their students.  They vent and share stories with understanding colleagues in the lunchroom or work room or even the office and don’t always think about who can overhear them and how callous they come across.  Whether it’s just letting off steam, or actually the way they feel, there is the perception of resentment.  Behavior problems especially are the subject of much complaining, and so often the educators’ and administrators’ attitudes are that of wanting to ship the student off to some other location where he won’t be OUR problem.  Teachers need more information and training on understanding disabilities and developing empathy. 

Matthew Allen
Reply with quote  #90 

If you could change the way we provide services to children with disabilities, what would you recommend? Discussion Question 3

I would suggest a stricter and more comprehensive method in which students are selected for inclusion classes. I agree that inclusion is a wonderful system for enhancing social skills and giving more students the chance to earn a diploma, but the harsh reality is that it just does not work for everybody. For example, I just had a student in an inclusion class who was well below even the other students with IEPs. I conferred with other teachers in the special education department and they agreed that she was borderline retarded and should not have been placed in inclusion classes. Further complicating matters, my site is inclusion-only, the other high school within the district does self-contained and pull-out classes. Fortunately, this student’s  teachers sympathized and they all passed her; but we cannot expect general education teachers to be so accommodating to everybody if we are not doing our part to select only qualified students for inclusion.

Again, my site is inclusion-only and this distinction would require some students to take self-contained classes at another school in the district, which could lead to transportation issues, social issues (being removed from friends), behavior problems (stemming from resentment over the transfer). If the school is inclusion-only, it should have an extensive special education department that would be able to provide self-contained services for students that do not qualify for inclusion. At my site, there was a special education teacher for English I, II, and III, but there was not one available for English IV, which is probably why the aforementioned student was placed in an inclusion class despite her relatively advanced learning disability.

Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:


Create your own forum with Website Toolbox!